#16: On Painting: 2D/3D

2D/3D

I used to claim that, “I make art because I have to” as the daily pursuit of the elusive goal of expressing ideas visually gave my life focus and direction in the same way that religion or a strong philosophical framework might provide this for others. Now I make art because I love to. The process of creation is is like meditation in that it is centering, calming and builds self-awareness.  Joy comes from overriding the over-busy mind and being present in the moment of creation. And to be in the moment, all other worries, problems, desires and ambitions must be put aside to be tuned into what the work needs as it comes into being.

The 2D/3D series built on earlier work in the Ephemera series. It explores the dualities of male & female, vertical and horizontal, soft and hard, open and closed, active & passive.

Affinity December 2005 oil on canvas 40” x 30”

Affinity
December 2005
oil on canvas
40” x 30”

These paintings built on the previous series by focusing more on the transition between an idea and its realization and between an idea realized in one dimension then translated into a third. A background interest was the concept that the observer not only influences what is observed but can direct that influence in a positive or negative way.  Often called the uncertainty principle, it is a fascinating discovery in that it affects all concepts of and understanding about creativity. It is described in Wikipedia as follows:

“This (the uncertainty principle) ascribes the uncertainty in the measurable quantities to the jolt-like disturbance triggered by the act of observation. Though widely repeated in textbooks, this physical argument is now known to be fundamentally misleading.[4][5] While the act of measurement does lead to uncertainty, the loss of precision is less than that predicted by Heisenberg’s argument; the formal mathematical result remains valid, however. Historically, the uncertainty principle has been confused[6][7] with a somewhat similar effect in physics, called the observer effect, which notes that measurements of certain systems cannot be made without affecting the systems. Heisenberg offered such an observer effect at the quantum level (see below) as a physical “explanation” of quantum uncertainty.[8] It has since become clear, however, that the uncertainty principle is inherent in the properties of all wave-like systems,[4] and that it arises in quantum mechanics simply due to the matter wave nature of all quantum objects. Thus, the uncertainty principle actually states a fundamental property of quantum systems, and is not a statement about the observational success of current technology.[9″

Cross-Purpose-#2
Cross Purpose #2
December 2005
Marion-Lea Jamieson
oil on canvas
48” x 36”

These works are intentionally lush to re-create on canvas the intensity of the process and to communicate that experience.  This assumes that imagination and creativity are human attributes that offer the greatest potential for harmony.  It also assumes that art can and should act as a counter-weight to the overwhelmingly empty or negative images with which we are continually barraged rather than underline them.

I wrestle with being  a modernist painter in a post-modern era.  While I recognize and accept the post-modern critique that has forced artists to examine their assumptions for socially enforced dysfunctional paradigms, I believe artists should move beyond a critical stance to a more pro-active role. While cynicism and irony have been important tools for creating distance from unrealistic optimism, I am interested in rejuvenating art’s role as an avenue for exploring spiritual aspects of human experience.  In an increasingly crowded globe with divisive religious differences, art can help to focus on what is worthwhile. Humbly aware of my own shortcomings, I am  working in that direction.

Every/No Thing November 2005 oil on canvas 36” x 48”

Every/No Thing
November 2005
oil on canvas
36” x 48”

Found Forms December 2005 oil on canvas 30” x 40”

Found Forms
December 2005
oil on canvas
30” x 40”

These paintings were developed during the summer I lived in a small cabin in an organic orchard in Winfield on the outskirts of Kelowna while working on a sculpture commission for that city.  After a long day onsite in the hot city I would return to the cabin in the evenings and draw.  It was almost a retreat experience as I barely had electricity and no phone, fax, computer or all the distracting paraphernalia of modern life.

I bought a sheaf of drawing papers, a bundle of oil pastels and lost myself in the joy of form, colour, line and texture.  In my nightly drawing sessions I was searching for an uninhibited flow of ideas from my unconscious to the paper via my oil sticks.

Memory  November 2005 oil on canvas 36” x 48”

Memory
November 2005
oil on canvas
36” x 48”

Working in euphoric bursts of energy, I had great satisfaction in having nothing to do with the rational mind.  I produced about 20 drawings in that time (see drawings page)

Physical Plane December 2005 oil on canvas 18” x 24”

Physical Plane
December 2005
oil on canvas
18” x 24”

The Winfield cabin drawings were experiments in using colour, line & form and back in my Vancouver studio, they were translated  into the more rigorous medium of oil paint on canvas. These drawing and paintings were then used as research for developing 3D ideas for concrete sculptures. Working through  drawings and paintings is an effective way to understand and refine concepts  to develop in 3D .

Resonance November 2005 oil on canvas 24” x 18”

Resonance
November 2005
oil on canvas
24” x 18”

Spell to Balance September 2005 oil on canvas 48” x 36”

Spell to Balance
September 2005
oil on canvas
48” x 36”

Edit

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *