Concrete Sculpture

I use concrete as a sculptural medium because it is possible to experiment on a large scale at low cost. Most of these concrete works have been hand-built on an armature, a process that allows for a broad range of expressive forms.

 

Memory Banks, September 2007 3’ h x 12’ w x 11.5’ d cast and hand-formed concrete, found objects  and paint Installed in Bear Creek Park, Surrey, BC
Memory Banks, September 2007
3’ h x 12’ w x 11.5’ d
cast and hand-formed concrete, found objects and paint
Installed in Bear Creek Park, Surrey, BC

 

Continuum, September 2005 concrete & pigments 60" high x 20" wide x 20" deep Shown at Bellingham Public Library, Bellingham, WA
Continuum, September 2005
concrete & pigments
60″ high x 20″ wide x 20″ deep
Shown at Bellingham Public Library, Bellingham, WA

 

Sine Wave, July 2005 54" h x 20" w x 20" d cast and hand-formed concrete & pigments shown at Peace arch Park, Blaine, WA
Sine Wave, July 2005
54″ h x 20″ w x 20″ d
cast and hand-formed concrete & pigments
shown at Peace arch Park, Blaine, WA

 

Conundrum, Marion-Lea Jamieson, June 2005, 66" h x 28" w x 40" d, concrete and pigments
Conundrum, Marion-Lea Jamieson, June 2005,
66″ h x 28″ w x 40″ d,
concrete and pigments

 

Sister Fish #1
Sister Fish #1, December 2003
6’ h x 2’ w x 2’ d
hand formed concrete and acid stain
Shown at Wescott Bay Sculpture Park, San Juan Island, WA

 

Birth of Venus, October 2003 54" high x 45" wide x 40" deep cast and hand formed concrete and pigment Shown at Big Rock Garden Sculpture Park, Bellingham WA
Birth of Venus, October 2003
54″ high x 45″ wide x 40″ deep
cast and hand formed concrete and pigment
Shown at Big Rock Garden Sculpture Park, Bellingham WA

 

Still-Life,  Marion-Lea Jamieson, March 2003, concrete  3.5' high x 3' wide x 3' deep
Still-Life, Marion-Lea Jamieson, March 2003,
concrete
3.5′ high x 3′ wide x 3′ deep

 

Marion-Lea Jamieson is an artist and sculptor from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada